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Activity: Halloween Candy Trading Post

October 25, 2016

By Jessica Vician

Activity: Halloween Candy Trading Post | How do you let your child enjoy his or her spoils from trick or treating without eating too much (or whining about not having enough)? Try this activity.

After the trick or treating ends and the costumes are put away, there’s one last thing a parent has to worry about for Halloween: the begging and pleading for one more! piece of candy.

How do you let your child enjoy his or her spoils from trick or treating without eating too much (or whining about not having enough)?

If your child is in elementary school or above, make a trading game out of it. Assign relative values to each candy. For example, two rolls of Smarties are equivalent to one two-pack of fun-size Starburst. Not only does this game teach your children to use both mathematical and analytical skills, but it also turns the candy into a commodity that your child will start to see as more than just a sugary, fruity, or chocolaty treat.

Once you have assigned the relative values to each candy, invite your kids to divide their candy into the various categories you have assigned. If you need help determining values, watch this hilarious and accurate Buzzfeed video.

Then, invite your kids to trade according to the value system in place. Since there is a lot of excitement on Halloween night, let them trade a few days’ worth of candy that night (and eat some of it, embracing the inevitable sugar high). In the days following, host a candy trading post at the kitchen table after school or dinner so that your kids can honor the value system and continue to trade their candy each night for one dessert’s worth.

Continue the activity every night until all the candy is gone. As a parent, you choose whether to participate or supervise. If you have an only child, you should definitely participate—otherwise, whom will he or she trade with every night? If you don’t want to eat your candy, bring it to the office or treat your child with it after his or her supply is gone.

This Halloween candy trading activity is a great way to trick your kids into rationing their treats without whining and overindulging while developing their analytical and bargaining skills at the same time.

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3 Small Acts of Kindness Your Child Can Do to Prevent Bullying

October 11, 2016

By Jessica Vician

3 Small Acts of Kindness Your Child Can Do to Prevent Bullying

What have you and your child done to stop bullying this month?

We’re midway through National Bullying Prevention Month, and while some schools have organized events to educate students on preventing and reporting bullying, not everyone has this programming. As a parent, you can challenge your child to take small actions for the rest of the month that will help him or her not only prevent bullying but also promote kindness.

STOMP Out Bullying, an organization dedicated to reducing and preventing bullying and cyberbullying, has created a list of activities, summarized below, that your child can do each week for the rest of the month to help with the bullying problem.

  1. Make friends with someone you don’t know.
    This week, encourage your child to start a conversation at school with a peer that he or she doesn’t know, or to invite that person to sit with your child at lunch. This small outreach helps your child expand his or her social circle and prevents both your child and the peer from feeling isolated and lonely.
  2. Stand up for someone.
    Next week, talk to your child about standing up for someone when they are being disrespected, made fun of, or physically bullied. It can be as simple as stepping into a conversation where a peer is being disrespected and saying, “Let’s keep it respectful here,” or telling someone to stop making fun of someone else. In physical bullying situations, advise your child on what to do—it might be safest for him or her to get an adult to interfere so that your child doesn’t get hurt.
  3. Promote positivity.
    For the final week of the month, send your child to school with colorful Post-its with positive messages, like, “You’re smart,” or “Thanks for being nice to me,” or “You make me smile.” Your child can hand them out to fellow classmates or even post them anonymously on people’s lockers. This tiny action will bring a little joy to everyone’s day.

You can also encourage your child’s school administration and/or teachers to promote the message by sending them a link to PACER’s classroom activities or organize an event in your community yourself.

Is your child’s school participating in National Bullying Prevention Month? Tell us what they’re doing in the comments below.

Tags :  emotionalbullying
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Say "Thank You" on World Teachers' Day

October 4, 2016

By Jessica Vician

Say "Thank You" on World Teachers' Day

“Strangely one of the most central, vital professionals to society does not receive the respect it deserves in some parts of the world.”

That observation comes directly from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in regards to teaching.

So how can we, as individuals in society, change that observation and give teachers the respect they deserve?

We can start by honoring World Teachers’ Day on October 5th and saying “thank you” to our children’s teachers.

Many teachers work long hours, arriving well before the bell rings to start school and staying well past the last bell ring. They take assignments home to grade after dinner. They prepare lesson plans before the first day of school. In many school systems, they’re not paid nearly enough for being tasked with inspiring a thirst for knowledge and a quality education to our children who will become tomorrow’s leaders. And many of them have to spend their own salary to buy supplies for their classrooms due to a lack of funding. Just look at the thousands of Go Fund Me pages started by teachers to stock their classrooms.

We don’t say, “Thank you” nearly enough. Think about what you can thank your child’s teacher for: cleaning her up after she got sick at school, spending extra time with him until he figured out fractions, listening to her as she cried about being bullied, pushing him to score a goal or achieve an athletic accomplishment despite being a little clumsy. Teachers are your extensions while your kids are in school, nurturing your children’s physical, academic, emotional, and social needs.

This World Teachers’ Day, think about what your child’s teacher has done for your daughter or son. Even though it’s early in the school year, you can probably think of something the teacher has done to go out of his or her way for your child. Write them a meaningful thank you card. And if you remember something a past teacher did for your child, send them a card as well. They’ll be touched you still remember.

Above all, remember how hard their jobs are and keep that in mind during each communication you have with them throughout the year. Give them your respect and they will continue to respect your child.

And as your child’s first teacher, thank you for the late nights, early mornings, long days, bad days, poopy diapers, temper tantrums, readings before bed, kisses in the morning, and so much more.

To teachers!

Tags :  teachersacademicparenting
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