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Want to Make Your Own Baby Food? Read These 7 Tips First

January 12, 2016

By Jessica Vician

Want to Make Your Own Baby Food? Read These 7 Tips First | Making baby food is pretty easy; after all, most of it consists of steamed and puréed vegetables or mashed-up fruits. Before you give it a try, read through these seven considerations to ensure you take proper precautions. | A baby looks at her food before eating it.

Before having a baby, many parents idealize what life will be like with the baby. From all-natural births to cloth diapers and organic creams, expectant parents fill their registries with products that suggest that we can do it all ourselves.

Then the baby comes and we realize that we’ll do anything to make raising our child easier and less painful. But one of those idealized visions can remain a reality: making your own baby food.

Not only is making baby food more economical than store-bought food, you can also control the nutrients and eliminate added chemicals and preservatives in your baby’s diet. And it gets the baby used to eating the same foods as the adults, which will make your transition to solid foods easier.

Making baby food is pretty simple; after all, most of it consists of steamed and puréed vegetables or mashed-up fruits. Before you give it a try, read through these seven considerations to ensure you take proper precautions.

1. Wait until your baby is 3-6 months old.
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends waiting until your baby is six months old to introduce finger and puréed food. If you follow proper sanitary guidelines, they say you can introduce baby food along with breast milk or formula as early as three months old.

Check with your pediatrician before changing your baby’s diet at any point, and talk to him or her about potential food allergies in advance.

2. Get the right equipment.
For the basics, you’ll just need a steamer and a food processor (or blender). If you want to splurge, there are plenty of all-in-one products that can aid in the whole process from peeling to steaming to blending.

This article breaks down the types of equipment you can use to make baby food.

3. Wash. Wash. Wash.
Wash everything that will come into contact with the food. Wash your hands and the surfaces you’re using to chop, dice, mash, etc. Wash the equipment and the food, even if you’re going to peel it. Keep everything clean to prevent the spread of bacteria to your baby.

4. Limit nitrates in the food.
Nitrates are found in plants, soil, and well water. If your baby is exposed to too many nitrates, he or she could develop a type of anemia known as “blue baby syndrome.”

To limit the amount of nitrates your baby ingests from homemade baby food, do the following:

  1. Consume or freeze baby food immediately. Nitrates develop in food the longer it sits, so if you’re not going to cook fruits or vegetables right away, use frozen versions. If you’re not going to use all of the prepared baby food within a few days, freeze extra portions the day you make it. You can defrost it later in the week or anytime in the next three months.
  2. If you have well water, test it for nitrates. If the levels are more than 10mg per liter, use purified or bottled water for all baby food (including formula).

5. Never sweeten baby food.
Babies don’t need extra sweetener. They get all they need from naturally occurring sugars in fruits and vegetables. It is especially dangerous to add honey to baby food, as it can cause botulism in babies under a year old.

6. Avoid any unpasteurized dairy products.
Raw or unpasteurized milk can contain dangerous bacteria that can cause illness, so just as you avoided it during pregnancy, you should avoid it when making baby food.

7. Have fun!
While it’s important to be diligent and cautious when making your own baby food, have fun experimenting with different flavors and textures to see what your baby likes. This website has great recommendations for starter fruits and vegetables, like peas, mangoes, squash, and more.

Do you make your own baby food? Share your favorite recipes in the comments below!

Tags :  early childhoodbabyphysicalhealthbudget
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5 Must-Read FAFSA Facts

January 7, 2016

By Jessica Vician

5 Must-Read FAFSA Facts | If your child is planning to go to college in the fall, complete the FAFSA as soon as possible to see what kind of funding he or she qualifies for. Once you know, your family can decide whether or not to accept the aid.  While time is of the essence, it’s also important to ask questions so you know what your child needs to do. | A piggy bank with a graduation cap sits on top of a pile of cash.

On January 1, 2016, students planning to attend college during the 2016-2017 school year became eligible to complete the FAFSA. FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. If your child is planning to go to college in the fall, complete the FAFSA as soon as possible to see what kind of funding he or she qualifies for. Once you know, your family can decide whether or not to accept the aid.

While time is of the essence, it’s also important to ask questions so you know what your child needs to do.

What is Federal Student Aid?
Federal Student Aid is a part of the U.S. Department of Education and serves as the largest provider of student financial aid in the U.S. They distribute over $150 billion annually in federal funds for college, career school, and work-study programs.

What kind of funding do they provide?
Federal Student Aid provides three types of funding:

  1. Grants, which are funds that don’t need to be repaid if your student remains in class
  2. Loans, which are borrowed for school and must be repaid with interest once the student is out of school (regardless of earning a degree)
  3. Work-study, which is a work program that helps your student earn money to pay for school

Is my child eligible for aid?
Students must meet at least eight eligibility requirements, including:

  • Demonstrate financial need
  • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen
  • Have a valid Social Security number
  • Be enrolled or accepted as a regular student in an eligible program
  • Sign the FAFSA certification statement
  • Demonstrate qualification to obtain college or career school education
  • Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in college or career school
  • Be registered with the Selective Service if your child is male

See the full list and details to these requirements on the Student Aid website.

When does my child need to apply?
Today!

The sooner your child applies for the FAFSA, the more likely he or she is to receive grants (if eligible) and other funding. Technically, the federal deadline is on June 30. However, many state and college deadlines are sooner.

For instance, many states have deadlines in early March. Illinois students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1, as the awards are available on a first-come, first-served basis in the state.

When does my child need to repay the loans?
It’s equally important that you and your student understand when and how to repay the loans.

After leaving school (with or without a degree), a student must start making payments on some loans immediately (like PLUS loans), while other lenders allow a six-month grace period before payments begin. Visit this page to learn more about repayment options.

Do you have other questions about Financial Aid? Ask in the comments below.

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10 Things to Know About Hidden Disabilities

January 5, 2016

By Jessica Vician

10 Things to Know About Hidden Disabilities | Between 13 to 20 percent of children in the U.S. experience a mental disorder each year, according to the CDC. That’s nearly one out of five kids. What can you do if your child shows signs of an issue? How can your treat your child’s friends and classmates who have special needs? | A teacher helps a girl learn.

Between 13 to 20 percent of children in the U.S. experience a mental disorder each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s nearly one out of five kids. What can you do if your child shows signs of an issue? How can your treat your child’s friends and classmates who have special needs?

In a guest post on Love That Max, filmmaker Dan Habib discusses 10 things people might not know about hidden disabilities. Usually labeled “emotional and behavioral disorders,” these disabilities include, but aren’t limited to: anxiety and depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, and more.

Read the article to learn about these 10 things you should know about hidden disabilities. From Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and how the education system works with special needs to how some of these children communicate through their behavior, the post is an important read for parents of children with and without special needs.

After reading the article, check out the rest of the blog, written by a mother of three children. One of those children, Max, has cerebral palsy and inspired the “blog about kids with special needs who kick butt.”

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