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Hanukkah Lessons for All Ages

December 2, 2013

By Stefanie Boron

Hanukkah Lessons for All Ages

As you may know, this year in a rare alignment of calendars, the first day of Hanukkah occurred on the same night as Thanksgiving.  Someone even coined the term Thanksgivukkah! Thanksgiving is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of each November. The Jewish calendar determines Jewish holidays so the dates change from year to year. Some years Hanukkah coincides with Christmas and sometimes it is earlier in December, but overlapping with Thanksgiving is extremely rare.

This occurrence might have changed the way some families celebrated Hanukkah this year, but our family chose to keep the holidays separate and celebrate Hanukkah a few days later. We still lit the menorah on Thanksgiving but didn’t combine the dishes or traditions. There wasn’t any sweet potato kugel or pumpkin matzo ball soup at my Thanksgiving table!

Hanukkah is referred to as the Festival of Lights, as we light Hanukkah candles to remember the miracle of the oil. When the flame in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem was out, only enough oil could be found to relight it for one day, but the oil lasted for eight days. Because of this miracle, Hanukkah is a celebration of faith and hope.

Children and adults alike enjoy Hanukkah. Take the time this holiday season to celebrate the miracles in our lives.

  • Make it special. So there isn’t a Christmas tree, but there are lights and presents! Decorate the house, bring out the Menorahs and dreidels and invite family and friends over to celebrate. It is our holiday season as well, so enjoy!
  • Cook traditional food. Traditional foods are potato pancakes with applesauce or sour cream and chocolate Hanukkah gelt, which are chocolate coins. Latkes are fried in the oil that we are celebrating and remembering on this holiday.
  • Spin the dreidel. The Hebrew letters on the dreidel stand for: A Great Miracle Happened There. Players usually play for pennies or Hanukkah gelt.
  • Celebrate all eight days. We celebrate for eight days because that was the duration of the miracle of the oil burning. Each night we light the menorah and say the prayers. We also exchange presents. Some families give presents every night, while some have one big Hanukkah celebration similar to Christmas morning.

After I get my shopping done I always look forward to Hanukkah! My house smells like potato latkes for days, but it is worth it!

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